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Link to WPGraphQL on Github
Link to WPGraphQL on WordPress.org

Users

WPGraphQL provides support for querying Users in various ways.

This page will be most useful for users that are familiar with GraphQL Concepts and understand the basics of writing GraphQL Queries.

Querying Users

List of Users

Below is an example of querying a list of users. In this example, we ask for users and then on the users field we ask for nodes, then the id and name of each user node.

Screenshot of a GraphQL query for users
Screenshot of a GraphQL query for users

Single User by Global ID

Below is an example of querying a single User by their global ID.

Screenshot of a GraphQL query for a single user by global ID
Screenshot of a GraphQL query for a single user by global ID

Sensitive Data

WPGraphQL follows WordPress access control rights, and only exposes data publicly that WordPress already exposes publicly. Users that have published posts are considered public entities in WordPress. Users that have not published posts are considered private and will not be included in public GraphQL requests, but will be included in GraphQL requests made by authenticated users with proper capabilities to see the users.

Fields, such as user email addresses, are also protected by WPGraphQL and only exposed to authenticated requests by users with proper capabilities to see the data.

Read more about WPGraphQL Security.

User Mutations

WPGraphQL provides mutations (the ability to change data through GraphQL) for Users.

WPGraphQL adheres to core access control rights, ensuring data can only be created, updated or deleted by users that have proper permission to do so. Learn more in our WPGraphQL Security guide.

Register User

Below is an example Mutation to register a new user. This mutation is intended to be used by public users on sites that have user registration turned on.

Unsuccessful Mutation

If user registration is turned off for the site (under “Settings > General” in the WordPress dashboard) then no user will be registered and an error will be returned with the mutation.

Screenshot of an unsuccessful registerUser mutation

Successful Mutation

If user registration is turned on for the site (under “Settings > General” in the WordPress dashboard) then a user will be registered and the fields requested in response will be returned.

Screenshot of a successful registerUser mutation

This will also kick off some other actions in WordPress, such as sending the new user the new user email.

Screenshot of the new user email sent after a new user registered.

Create User

The createUser mutation is intended to be used by users that have proper capabilities to create new users. This mutation will only execute if the user making the request is authenticated and has proper capabilities to create new users.

Below is an example of a mutation to create a user. A username and email address must be provided.

Unsuccessful Mutation

If the user making the request is not authenticated or does not have proper capabilities to create a user, no user will be created in WordPress and an error will be returned.

Screenshot of an unsuccessful GraphQL mutation to create a user

Successful Mutation

If the user making the request is authenticated and has proper capabilities to create a new user, a new user will be created in WordPress, a new user email will be sent to that new user, and the data asked for in response to the mutation will be returned.

Screenshot showing a successful createUser mutation
Screenshot showing a successful createUser mutation

Update User

Below is an example of a GraphQL Mutation to update a user.

The users ID must be provided as input on the mutation.

Successful Mutation

If the user making the request is authenticated and has proper capabilities to update the user, the user’s data will be updated in WordPress and the specified fields will be returned in response.

Screenshot of a successful GraphQL mutation to update a user

Unsuccessful Mutation

If the user making the request is not authenticated or does not have proper capabilities to update the user, no data will be changed in WordPress and an error will be returned.

Screenshot of an unsuccessful GraphQL Mutation to update a user
Screenshot of an unsuccessful GraphQL Mutation to update a user

Delete User

Below is an example of a GraphQL Mutation to delete a user. In order to delete a user, the ID of the user must be known and provided to the input.

Successful Mutation

If the user making the request to delete a user is authenticated and has proper capabilities to delete the user, the user will be deleted and the fields requested will be returned.

Screenshot of a successful GraphQL Mutation to delete a user
Screenshot of a successful GraphQL Mutation to delete a user

Unsuccessful Mutation

If the user making the request to delete a user is not authenticated or does not have proper capabilities to delete the user, the user will not be deleted and an error will be returned.

Screenshot of an unsuccessful GraphQL Mutation to delete a user
Screenshot of an unsuccessful GraphQL Mutation to delete a user

Send Password Reset Email

When a user needs to reset their password, they will need to have a “Reset Password” email sent.

The sendPasswordResetEmail mutation can be used for this.

Below is an example of using this mutation:

This mutation could be used to create an interface like the Reset Password screen in WordPress.

Screenshot of the WordPress "reset password" screen
Screenshot of the WordPress “reset password” screen

Reset User Password

When a user requests a Reset User Password email, the email that is sent contains a unique key that grants the user access to reset the password.

When using a decoupled front-end, when a user clicks the link in the email they will be taken to the decoupled front-end and the key needs to be be passed from the decoupled front-end back to WordPress to process the reset.

This mutation can be used for this case, to provide users with a reset password form.

Screenshot of the WordPress reset password form.
Screenshot of the WordPress reset password form.

Below is an example of this Mutation.

Successful Mutation

If the key and username combo are valid, the provided password will be used to reset the users password.

Unsuccessful Mutation

If the key or username is invalid or the key doesn’t match the username, the password will not be reset and an error will be returned.

Screenshot of an unsuccessful resetPasswordMutation